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Jan 25 10 1:41 PM

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BATTLE OF THE ALAMO 1836 (Joe's Pics) PART 2



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062: Colonel Manuel Cespedes ralies his Permanente Guerrero and sends them in again against Crockett's Texian defenders.

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063: General Cos's assault batallions prepare to scale the weakly defended and vulnerable south-west corner.

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064: Texian resistance at the south-west corner is swept away by Cos's determined assault. Activo Guanajuato claim the glory of being the first Mexican unit to enter the mission compound.

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065: Fierce hand-to-hand fighting atop the south postern as Colonel Francisco Duque's troops succeed in scaling the wall.

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066: The second assault on the gun emplacement gains traction now that the Texian guns are perilously low on ammunition.

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067: Santa Ana reinforces his brother-in-law's success at the south-west corner by sending in his Zapadores Battalion in support.

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068: Colonel Romero's leading battalions lose 40%+ killed and wounded to Dikinson's deadly artillery as they assault the east wall.

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069: The renewed Mexican assault on the postern and gun emplacement gathers steam.

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070: Amat's Activo Queretaro storm the smouldering remains of the 18 pdr gun position.

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071: A fierce melee erupts on the north-western perimeter when Colonel Manuel Cespedes' Permanente Guerrero successfully scale the wall on their second attempt.

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072: A gun is pulled out of the emplacement and turned to fire upon the Activo Guanajuato as they stream away from the wall and advance towards the middle of the compound.

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073: Capitain Cassales of the Activo Primero Mexico is cut down by rifle fire as bravely he leads the attack on the Texian gun emplacement.

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074: General Cos consolidates his gains in the south-west corner.

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075: Texian militia sharpshooters come under fire from Santa Ana's howitzers.

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076: Dikinson & Neill's withering artillery fire keeps Colonel Romero's battalions away from the east wall.

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077: Colonel Romero's Permanente Matamoros Battalion fight to wrest control of the destroyed 18 pdr position from the Texian militiamen.

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078: Colonel Cespedes (mounted) is wounded in the shoulder by an ex-US Army volunteer.

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079: Texian resistance begins to crumble all along the west wall following General Cos's successful entry into the main compound by way of the south-west corner.

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080: The Activo Guanajuato capture an unspiked Texian 4 pdr and turn it on the defenders at the chapel.

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081: The Texian artillery crew come under counter-battery fire from one of their own captured guns at the south-west corner.

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082: The Activo Guanajuato give no quarter to the Texians as they sweep down from the south-west wall into the compound below.

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083: The New Orleans Greys fight it out against Permanente grenadiers in a bitter rooftop melee.

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084: Colonel Travis's artillery expends the last of their ammunition as General Castrillón's troops reach the north-west corner.

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085: The Activo Guanajuato chase Davy Crockett and two Texian militiamen across the mission compound towards the chapel.

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086: Santa Ana's troops gain a foothold in the weakened Texian gun emplacement.

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087: Santa Ana consolidates his assault on the roof of the posturn.

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088: It's a target-rich environment for the Tejano gunners atop the south postern.

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089: General Romero's battered battalions finally make it to the east wall and commence their scaling operations.

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090: Davy Crockett & Co. skidaddle away from the south-west corner as fast as they can run.

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091: The Activo Guanajuato turn their captured Texian 4 pdr on the south postern's Tejano gun crew, killing half their number before they are able to return fire.

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092: "Run Crockett, run!". Davy is desperate to reach the safety of the distant chapel before the mass of pursuing Activo Guanajuato skewer him with their bayonets.

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093: The south postern falls to Santa Ana's troops.

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094: Colonel Cespedes (wounded) directs his men to sweep the battlements with musket fire. Few Texians survive this deadly enfilade.

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095: Mexican grenadiers fight to capture the Alamo mission's flag near the inner archway of the postern.

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096: Colonel Travis's men put up a spirited fight against Castrillón's Permanente.

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097: Crockett & Co. increase the distance between themselves and their bloodthirsty pursuers.

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098: Mexican reinforcements pour into the postern unchecked.

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099: Colonel Romero's troops scale the east wall.

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100: Texian militiamen fight hard to repel the attack on the destroyed 18 pdr position.

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101: General Castrillón's Activo Tres Villas take advantage of the dead ground immediately below the Texian gun position where they are safe from artillery fire.

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102: Colonel Travis bravely stands his ground against the enemy on the battlements, despite overwhelming odds.

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103: The few surviving Texian defenders on the west wall are pushed back to the very edge of the roof by their determined Mexican adversaries.

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104: Mexican troops pour across the south-west wall unchecked.

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105: The Zapadores Battalion advances towards the palisade gate at the entrance to the postern.

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106: Jim Bowie prepares to fight to the finish, with "his back braced against the wall, and using his pistols and his famous knife."

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107: Davy Crockett signals to the Texians on the chapel roof to give covering fire as he and his companions race to stay ahead of their Mexican pursuers.

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108: Battle of the Banners. The Texian standard bearer puts up a spirited fight to prevent the Mexicans from capturing the Alamo mission's flag.

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109: Colonel Duque's men storm the Texian gun emplacement.

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110: Captain Hernandez leads the counter-push against the Texian militiamen atop the smoking remains of the 18 pdr position.

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111: The last of Crockett’s defenders on the west wall make a fighting retreat across the compound.

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112: Colonel Duque’s assault troops gain entry to the gun emplacement.

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113: The New Orleans Greys make their final stand at the west wall.

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114: General Castrillón's Activo Tres Villas cannot be hit by Texian artillery now that they have taken cover in the dead ground below the gun position in the centre of the north wall.

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115: General Cos arrives at the south-west corner to spur his men on to victory.

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116: Billy Wolf, the young son of Texian militiaman Anthony Wolf, is nearly decapitated by a stray round shot as he takes cover behind the west wall.

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117: One of Santa Ana’s reserve battalions arrive at the postern to support the attack on the southern approaches.

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118: The postern falls to the Mexicans.

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119: The gun emplacement (lower right) is overrun by Colonel Duque's assault troops.

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120: Colonel Romero’s men overwhelm one of Neill’s 12 pdr positions on the east wall.

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121: Colonel Travis puts up a brave battle against overwhelming odds atop the 4pdr gun position at the north-west corner.

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122: General Cos’s troops surge across the south compound towards the mission chapel.

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123: Zapadore pioneers begin to demolish the palisade surrounding the entrance arch to the postern.

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124: Crockett and his companions stagger towards the open door of the chapel. The die indicates 1 wound sustained by one of Davy’s men.

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125: Colonel Romero’s men fight their way into the buildings inside the east perimeter wall.

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126: Fall of the east wall. Texian gunners and militiamen make a fighting retreat towards the long barracks as Colonel Romero’s men overwhelm the outer defences.

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127: Zapadore pioneers start to hack their way through the postern’s palisade gates.

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128: The New Orleans Greys fight to the finish on the west wall.

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129: Colonel Travis wins the melee and forces his attackers back. He makes one last desperate bid to push away the scaling ladder before Mexican reinforcements arrive.

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130: General Cos’s troops capture the Alamo mission flag and consolidate their ground in the middle of the southern compound.

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131: Mexican conscript reserves capture a Texian gun on the west wall.

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132: The last of the Texian gunners are overwhelmed at the emplacement adjoining the mission chapel.

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133: The Zapadore pioneers demolish the palisade and enter the postern’s entrance archway.

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134: Cos’s valiant troops reform in preparation for the final assault on the chapel.

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135: Colonel Travis’s last stand. The courageous Texian leader is bayoneted to death with his back against a bunkhouse in the north-west quarter of the mission compound.

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136: A Texian sharpshooter takes a shot at Romero from the roof of the long barracks. The musket ball grazes the Colonel’s head.

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137: The Mexican Activos fail to search the south bunkhouse (top left) in their haste to reach the mission chapel. If they had, they would have discovered James Bowie lying semi-conscious on a cot inside the room after having been carried there by militiamen earlier in the battle.

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138: The north and west walls are secured by the Mexicans.

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139: Texian gunners prepare to greet the first Mexicans through the chapel door with a blast of improvised canister shot.

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140: The Mexicans take control of the south compound.

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141: Texian sharpshooters on the roof of the chapel. They are all badly wounded after receiving several direct hits from Santa Anna’s howitzers,

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142: Texian militiamen fight desperately to deny Romero’s troops access to the long barracks roof.

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143: Colonel Romero directs his reserve battalion to support the successful assault on the east wall.

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144: Texian gunners and militiamen fall back towards the chapel along the roof of the long barracks, pursued and harried every step of the way by Romero’s Mexicans.

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145: No quarter is given to Colonel Travis’s wounded men when General Morales' troops seize the north-west gun position.

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146: Out of ammunition, the Texian gunners await their inevitable demise as Colonel Romero’s troops capture and secure the nursery garden behind the east wall.

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147: The Zapadore pioneers are sent forward to assault the mission chapel’s main door ahead of the final attack.

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148: The retreating Texian militiamen atop the long barracks are cut down by a volley of musket fire from a Mexican conscript battalion in the compound below.

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149: The remnants of Dikinson’s artillery are killed in the nursery garden while defending their gun to the last.

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150: The Mexican Army advances towards the mission chapel door in the final phase of the battle.

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151: The chapel roof is captured by Santa Ana’s troops. The Mexcian flag is raised victoriously above the heaped and wounded bodies of the Texian sharpshooters who defended their position valiantly to the last.

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152: President of Mexico, General Antonio López de Santa Anna, makes his triumphal entrance into the south compound of the Alamo mission, cheered on by his victorious troops.

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153: Susannah Dikinson and her infant daughter, Angelina, are spared by Colonel Romero’s soldiers.

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154: The last of the Texian militiamen are overrun and killed at the top of the steps from the nursery garden.

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155: Before they can discharge their cannon, the Texian gunners inside the chapel are killed by a barrage of howitzer and captured cannon fire directed at them prior to the final assault.

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156: General Morales leads his reserve battalions across the northern section of the compound.

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157: It’s all over bar the shouting. “¡Viva Santa Ana!" "¡Viva Mexico!”

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158: Davy Crockett (a.k.a. Ron Ringrose) and his companion, Brigido Guerrero, make a sneaky escape from the chapel using a tall ladder propped against the east wall. In the real battle, Guerrero, who had deserted from the Mexican Army in December 1835, escaped death after he was able to convince Santa Ana’s soldiers that he was a Texian prisoner.


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Battle Stats
Date: February 23 – March 6, 1836
Location: San Antonio de Béxar (modern-day San Antonio, Texas).
Result: Overwhelming Mexican victory

Forces
Mexican Commander: Antonio López de Santa Anna.
Mexican Army: 2,400

Texian Commander(s): William Travis, James Bowie.
Texians: 182-260

Casualties
Mexicans: 400-600 killed or wounded
Texians: 180-258 killed

Game Credits
Played: 23 January 2010
The Alamo Mission: by Hudson & Allen (USA) http://www.wargamescenics.com/Alamo_Model_Pictures.html
Venue: Dave Marks
Figures: from the collection of Dave Marks, painted by Steven Danes.
Rules: Legends of the Old West (Warhammer Historical).
LotOW The Alamo – Victory or Death supplement.
Photography & Captions: Joe Dever
Outcome: Conclusive Mexican victory.

The Players
Martyn Monks, Paul Mumford, Sam Marks, Michael Stratford, Henri Mumford, John Horwood, Ron Ringrose, Steven Danes, Joe Dever, Tom Horwood, Mick Hoddy, Pat Smith, Martin Lampon.

Umpire
Dave Marks

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BACK TO PART ONE: http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=2686


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"Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake." (Napoleon Bonaparte)

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#2 [url]

Oct 22 10 2:40 AM

I am thinking of doing an Alamo game for my 40k group, I have a bit of casting to do, mostly walls and some of the buildings have to be cut down and recast.

what I would like to know is how you run a game like this with so many players? I assume that you need to follow an historical script, but I notice that you use GW templates, is the rule-set similar to the one that 40k uses?

Where can I find more information about the layout, was it in a private property or at a club, what was the total size of the board and how long did it take to play?

Thanks,

Thylacine.

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