avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218

Field Marshal Cacs

Lead

Jun 17 09 7:08 PM

Tags : :

image


live">The Battle of Amiens,

fought between 8 and 11 August 1918, marked the beginning of the British advance that cumulated in the Armistice of 11 November 1918. The preparations for the battle included unprecedented security in order to achieve maximum surprise. The Canadian Corps was secretly moved to the Somme area and took over the southern half of the Australian front line. The Australia Corps was concentrated between the Canadians and the Somme River while the British held the line north of the river. The infantry moved into their assembly positions in the small hours of 8 August. A dense fog gathered and unseen aeroplanes droning above drowned out the noise of the tanks that would support the infantry. The fog was still dense at 4.20 am when the artillery barrage opened fire and the advance began

imageimage

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#1 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:02 PM

image

'Over the Top' - Two Fat Lardies' WW1,.
28mm, hand-built terrain. own rules: 'To the Green Fields Beyond'
___________________________________________________________

Page 1
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=2361&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
Page 2
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=2361&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15
Page 3
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?p=40326#40326

image
Captured British tank

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#4 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:05 PM

image


It was Mr. Churchill who, as First Lord of the Admiralty, gave the first order for eighteen tanks, or "landships" as they were then called, on March 26, 1915. He did not inform either the War Office or the Treasury--an almost unprecedented and certainly uncons[nipple]utional reticence, dictated by fear that conventional minds might stifle a great idea

Sir Winston S. Churchill, quoted in Colin Coote, ed., Maxims and Reflections, 1949

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#5 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:06 PM

image


September 15, 1916: First tank attack in history during the Battle of the Somme at the village of Flers.

live">The tanks that first saw action at the Somme in September 1916 had, to a remarkable extent, been engineered out of the cultural imagination. Tank-like machines were featured in wargaming pioneer HG Wells'short story "The Land Iron Clads," a work of science fiction first published in the Strand Magazine in 1903.
BBC Website

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#6 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:06 PM

image
Crossing a trench

October 20, 1917: First successful large-scale attack integrating tanks with infantry attack at the Battle of Cambrai by the British Army.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#7 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:07 PM

image



The Battle of Cambrai
(20 November - 3 December 1917)

........The first successful use of tanks in a combined arms operation, the British attack demonstrated that the Hindenburg Line could be penetrated, while the German counter attack showed the value of new infantry tactics that would later be part of the Kaiserschlacht. Liddell Hart called the battle "one of the landmarks in the history of warfare, the dawn of a new epoch."

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#8 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:07 PM

image
Australian soldiers pose with a British tank crew at Lamotte–Warfusée, France, 8 August 1918.

Battle of Amiens
8 August 1918

Between late March and late July 1918 the strategy of the German Army on the Western Front was to firstly force a wedge between the British and French armies, and then destroy the British before overwhelming the French. The German commanders argued for this strategy because Russia pulling out of the war provided the opportunity to move German divisions from the east and use them in the west. The strategy had to be carried out quickly, before the rapid build-up of American forces meant the Allies became too powerful for Germany to ever win.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#9 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:08 PM

image

The German offensive began against the British on 21 March and from then until late July the Germans everywhere took the initiative in seeking to bring the French and British to battle.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#10 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:08 PM

image

On 14 July 1918, the German Army launched its last great attack on the French in the area of the Marne River, east of Paris and on either side of the major city of Rheims. The French had anticipated this move and had held their front line lightly. Then, as the Germans went forward, they encountered strong French reserves and were repulsed. On 18 July the French, accompanied by fresh American divisions, counter-attacked. This Franco-American advance drove the enemy back towards his main supply railhead. Taken by surprise, the Germans began to pull back and a major offensive against the British in Flanders was called off as reinforcements were sent south. It was a turning point on the Western Front.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#11 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:09 PM

image


The great German offensive had faltered and was not resumed. The initiative now passed back to the Allies and it was decided that a major British attack would be made east of Villers-Bretonneux. It was thought that because of constant Australian harassment there, the Germans’ morale was low and their fortifications weak.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#12 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:09 PM

image
German soldiers waiting for the attack


The Battle of Amiens, fought between 8 and 11 August 1918, marked the beginning of the British advance that cumulated in the Armistice of 11 November 1918. The preparations for the battle included unprecedented security in order to achieve maximum surprise. The Canadian Corps was secretly moved to the Somme area and took over the southern half of the Australian front line.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#13 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:10 PM

The Australia Corps was concentrated between the Canadians and the Somme River while the British held the line north of the river. The infantry moved into their assembly positions in the small hours of 8 August. A dense fog gathered and unseen aeroplanes droning above drowned out the noise of the tanks that would support the infantry. The fog was still dense at 4.20 am when the artillery barrage opened fire and the advance began.

image

These early attacks were carried out in dense fog with infantry and tanks moving in what they hoped was the right direction. The first objective was seized by 7.30 and some German positions were bypassed and then attacked in the rear. Most of the German field artillery was overrun and quickly captured. By 8.20 the fog had began to thin and fresh troops resumed the advance.

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#14 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:10 PM

Charles Bean, the Australian official historian wrote:

A little later the mist suddenly cleared, and for a moment all eyes on the battlefield took in the astonishing scene: infantry in lines of hundreds of little section-columns all moving forward – with tanks, guns, battery after battery, the teams [Kate Moss]ing their manes.


Charles Bean, Anzac to Amiens, Canberra, 1948, p.471



image

British soldiers try to keep their trench dry by pumping the water

When the fog lifted German guns opened up at the tanks and put many out of action, but the Australian infantry kept going and soon overran most of the guns. The greater part of the final objective for the day, the old outer line of the Amiens defence system, was captured. The Canadian and French attacks had gone as well as those of the Australians and 25 kilometres of the German front south of the Somme was swept away in a victory that far surpassed any previous success of the British Army on the Western Front. More than 13,000 Germans were made prisoners and more than 200 guns captured. The French had taken 3500 prisoners. General Eric von Ludendorff, the German commander, later wrote of 8 August 1918:

The black day of the German Army in this war. ... The 8th of August put the decline of that [German] fighting power beyond all doubt. ... The war must be ended.


Ludendorff, quoted by Charles Bean, Anzac to Amiens, Canberra, 1948, p.473

_________________________________________________________
'Over the Top' - Two Fat Lardies' WW1
Page 1
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=2361&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0
Page 2
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=2361&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=15
Page 3
http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?p=40326#40326

Quote    Reply   
avatar

Cacadores

Brig. General

Posts: 10,218 Field Marshal Cacs

#15 [url]

Jun 17 09 10:11 PM

image

The advance continued on the following days with the Australians taking Etinehem, Lihons and Proyart. Australian casualties for the offensive, mainly from 9–12 August, were 6,000 killed and wounded.

FILM - to give you a flavour of the trenches:
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x4ttgw_ww1-hell-in-the-trenches_people

Quote    Reply   
Add Reply

Quick Reply

bbcode help